I know autumn doesn’t officially start until the 22nd, but can you blame a girl for getting excited anyway? Yes, I don’t care, put me in with the legions of basic bitches who love fall and cable knit sweaters and hot drinks and blah blah blah. I check all the marks. But I’ve loved autumn since before it was an aesthetic obsession so #FightMe. Yet beyond me being excited about September… Here’s some articles that I’ve loved the past month! If you’re looking for a few things to read while you sip on your pumpkin spice latte (even though they’re the one fall-ish thing I can’t stand, ick) then take a look at these lovely links: 1. Why We Love Personality Quizes, Even When We Know They’re Meaningless by Constance Grady So what is it about personality quizzes like the Meyers-Briggs test and the Hogwarts sorting quiz and newspaper horoscopes and BuzzFeed’s entire quiz category that are so immensely compelling? Why are we drawn to them even when we know they don’t mean anything? I originally retweeted this article with the caption “I feel so attacked right now.” And that’s pretty much still the case. I’m a total sucker for personality tests and collecting labels (Ravenclaw-Leo-INTJ, what’s good) so I was both intrigued and sad to read this. Spoiler alert: we like tests because of the “tribalistic” parts of our brain always feel a need to belong. While there are a few sections of the article I’d argue with – I think the author is a bit hard on how people view Myers-Briggs – overall I thought it was super interesting. And even though we think things like Buzzfeed quizzes and Hogwarts houses are harmless…here’s a friendly reminder to analyze ourselves when it comes to obsessing over other, more serious groups like political parties, race, etc. It’s crazy to think about how this primal part of our brain ends up touching so many parts of our lives, both big and small. 2. Meteor Showers in 2017 That Will Light Up The Night Skies by Nicholas St. Fleur All year long as Earth revolves around the sun, it passes through streams of cosmic debris. The resulting meteor showers can light up night skies from dawn to dusk, and if you’re lucky you might be able to catch one. I feel like most people think of meteor showers with summer…or maybe that’s just me?…

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Today is September 1, 2017. And if you’re a Harry Potter nerd like me, you’re freaking out about it. For those not aware: today marks the timeline-approved date that Deathly Hallows’ “Nineteen Years Later” epilogue would have taken place. And I know the actual 20 year anniversary of HP was only a month ago. And maybe it’s a little strange to get extra sentimental about a fictional date in a story epilogue than you were over a real-life milestone. But there’s just something about…September? I don’t know. It’s just always been that way for me. Growing up, 1) I was a quiet nerd who loved Harry Potter and 2) I was obsessed with fall and the start of the new school year. I loved school. I hated the aimless feeling I got from summer break. And the excitement of magic and learning and fall always came together in HP, every time Harry would board the fictional train on September 1st. And honestly, Rowling just as a way of writing those perfect fall vibes — like in the start of Deathly Hallow’s epilogue: Autumn seemed to arrive suddenly that year. The morning of the first of September was crisp and golden as an apple, and as the little family bobbed across the rumbling road towards the great sooty station, the fumes of car exhausts and the breath of pedestrians sparkled like cobwebs in the cold air. Ugh. Childhood feels. Like Harry, I felt like September always meant a fresh start. It meant anything was possible, there was adventure around the corner, that my favorite time of the year was here and I was finally, finally happy. Even though I’m now graduated and no longer have “back to school” days to look forward to (and I could write a whole post on that alone), having this anniversary and my post-grad status collide felt a bit unique. I was a bit sad. But also a bit optimistic. And even though the schedule of my life takes a different form these days, that same swell of energy hit me like before. Waking up today, at the end of a hard August, I found myself actually smiling. I turned to my boyfriend and was like, “Hey. Guess what? September is gonna be my month.” I plan on sticking to that. Happy “Nineteen Years Later” anniversary, everybody. ✌🏻  

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It’s only been three months since I graduated, but it already feels like a million years. My life’s now a spinning cycle of retail work and internship hours and awkward bus rides with an old dude two seats down who won’t stop staring. Fun stuff. Hard to believe a few weeks ago my life consisted of sorority events and essays I was definitely procrastinating on. But even though I suffering from senioritis and thought I’d thrown all my cares out the window…I think school affected me more in the long run than I was expecting. Which sounds totally stupid off the bat. Of course five years of college affects you! I learned so much from higher education and to say I’ve “changed” since freshmen year would be an understatement. But its one thing to have more knowledge and more skills after your degree. A thing you don’t expect? Your creativity getting messed with. I assume most of you reading this post are bloggers yourselves, or at the very least are “creative” kinda people (be it writing, music, whatever). And if you’re a creative person, you know how deeply connected you are to that special side of yourself. Imagination is a crazy, personal, wonderful thing. …But professors aren’t always down with crazy and personal. Following a syllabus. Sticking to outlines. Having the same 5 paragraph essay or Buzzfeed style listicle. I loved my college and learned a lot of great things from my classes, but after years of writing exactly what your teachers wanted, how do you remember what you want? I knew all of this in theory. But it didn’t become obvious until I started writing this blog. Here I was, with no rubric to follow, and half the time I didn’t even know where to begin. It was a wild feeling since I’ve always loved expressing myself and literally got a concentration in creative writing. But almost felt uncomfortable to put something out there that wasn’t totally ~neatly organized~. It was then I realized I had to unlearn how to write — which was a weird way of putting it, but true all the same. I had to strip away all the years of being told how to act, how to talk, how to be creative if I really wanted to get my own voice back. It’s been an awkward, uncomfortable process at times and I’m def still slowly changing.…

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Hey everyone! I feel like I wrote my July must reads not that long ago…but that’s probably because I did them in the middle of the month instead of at the start (#oops). Such is the life of a blogger / figuring out a new series. Guess there’s a quicker turn around this time. Either way, there’s been plenty of new articles these past few weeks! August is off to a great, thunderstorm-y start in my city, so I’m more than happy to snuggle up inside and get some reading done. If you’re also looking for a few good articles to dig in to, here’s this month’s must reads! 1. Forget Calories. Exercise For Awe. by Julia Baird “We are wrong to think of exercise only as something to build muscle and ease anxiety. If we can, we should force ourselves out of gyms and off machines into the natural world, knowing, or hoping, that we may stumble upon awe.” As my RL friends can attest to, I’ve been on a bit of a body acceptance / health feminism bend lately. I’ve already learned so much from some amazing writers (who I might do a blog post on sometime) and honesty there’s nothing better than feeling your mind growing while trying to better yourself. For the record: body acceptance goes beyond “body positivity” and the kind of cheesy marketing that often goes with it (like this cringy ad). Instead, it’s about analyzing society’s beauty standards, seeing how diet culture is dangerously flawed, and realizing that body shape does not equal “health.” Skinny people can be unhealthy. Larger people can be perfectly fit. Our very standards of ~health~ are extremely biased. Etc, etc, etc. ANYWAY. What I liked most about Baird’s piece was the focus on the emotional side of exercise. I totally get if swimming and running aren’t your thing, but I know my favorite parts of track ~back in the day~ were those moments when you felt your body being powerful, when you felt like you could do anything. It’s also so, so, so important not to get caught up in the calorie counting side of things. Been there, done that, and it can turn into a vicious cycle if you’re not careful. Exercise can be so much more than hitting your FitBit goals. Instead, just focus on giving your body good nutrients and finding a kind of movement that makes…

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